Scientists 3D print cartilage by using "ink" composed of human cells

Scientists 3D print cartilage by using "ink" composed of human cells
This new method could lead to a whole new range of prosthetics and replacement tissues for noses, ears and damaged knees.

By Ruben KuiperOn 28 Mar 2016

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Researchers at the Wallenberg Wood Science Center in Sweden have been able to develop a way of 3D bioprinting cartilage by using some kind of 'ink' composed of human cells. This new method could lead to a whole new range of prosthetics and replacement tissues for noses, ears and damaged knees – which in itself is pretty incredible.
The ink of cells can be printed in any shape and retains its shape with an internal 'skeleton' of fibrils
But how is this possible? They created the so-called bioink from scratch by learning how to manufacture an ink of human cells that wouldn't collapse into a gelatinous mess once printed. The solved this problem they developed a kind of 'scaffolding' process into the bioink. The result is a malleable ink of cells that can be printed in any desired shape, and even more important, retains its shape with an internal 'skeleton' of fibrils.

 

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Although they ink is at the moment not made out of a patient's own cells, the researchers hope that one day the will be able to. Furthermore, they are working with a plastic surgeon to fine tune the process. And even better news, they are also creating 3D bioprinted human skin for cosmetics testing!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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